Adult content webpage

CDR Comment: ‘Parasite’ porn websites & home-made porn | guardian.co.uk

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Revenge Porn – Comments by Dr J.C. Reid.

‘Parasite’ porn websites stealing images and videos posted by young people | Technology | guardian.co.uk.

I think the article lined to above is worth reading for all, especially for younger people.  It will come as little surprise to most people that for a data recovery company it is normal to process and recover all data that is stored on a hard disk drive or other storage device. Sometimes it is even necessary to recover data that has been purposely deleted.

As you can imagine over the 6 years trading with CDR I have been privy to all manner of data, whether this be from large corporate and public sector organisations to individual home users. Obviously all data recovered is kept on a secure server for a finite period and any details associated with the data are kept in the utmost confidentiality.  What I would like to comment on is what I would consider to be a growing trend to find more user generated pornography on storage devices. Sometimes it might simply be slightly ‘saucy’ provocative pictures, and in other cases it relates to self-made hardcore video. Either way it tends to be content that the owner would not ever want to be distributed into the public domain.

Adult content webpageTwo particular occasions come to mind. One when a mother had brought her teenage daughter’s hard disk drive in to have data recovered that related to her ‘A’ level coursework. And a second where a customer specifically requested the repair and recovery of an encrypted .ZIP file which contained pornographic footage of him and his ex-girlfriend. The latter seemed a little worrying purely on the basis on why he might want to retain such data. However, I found the former instance most concerning. I did not raise the issue with the mother directly, but inquired as to the age of her daughter, who she confirmed was 18. There was significant amounts of video footage and high quality jpeg images. The content looked as if it had been made with the purpose to distribute to a boyfriend or other romantic partner. There have been very few occasions whilst conducting data recovery that I have genuinely been shocked but this was one. It was not necessarily the actual content that shocked me. Instead my surprise was due to the age of the woman, the professional quality of the content, and the appearance of such carefree abandon from the teenager, both in the digital footage, and also when it was necessary for me to speak to her regarding the recovery of the required data.

It felt that the storage and distribution of such adult content seemed completely normal for a person of 18 years (in 2010); this is what shocked me the most. The thought that if this young woman was producing such content it is likely that a great deal of other young women are doing the same, and potentially leaving themselves liable for a horrible shock in the future if such content is misappropriated.

I felt there was gross naivety on behalf of this young woman, that or an overwhelming trust of the individual(s) whom she was sharing the content with. At the time I felt extremely concerned, and I still do regarding how most people do not fully comprehend how easily digital media can be redistributed and duplicated, whist at the same time being nearly impossible to stop  or remove the content from public websites.

Other instances to spring to mind, not least data recovery work CDR has conducted for high-profile individuals in the music, sport and television industries, all of which potentially ’embarrassing’ content has been found. With the potential monetary gain that some individuals seek, which have been well publicised regarding ‘Tulisa’ sex tape debacle, I wonder how far other people might go with access to potentially embarrassing data or footage of another person.

Consequently I urge young people, and young women in particular, to seriously consider the consequences of allowing such content to be made, let alone the who should ‘own’ it. That of course assumes that they are indeed consenting to the recording or photography. Unfortunately, I expect in many cases that they are not.

Dr J.C. Reid